7 Ways to Think Like An Athlete


We admire athletes for their focused approach to performance. They tap into discipline, strength and positive thinking and get results. Think like an athlete and perform better at sport – and in life!

 

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  1. Think big. Be limitless in your thought process. In a special article for the New England Journal of Medicine, the authors reveal that the more ambitious the weight loss goal, the bigger the success!
    However, it also makes sense to start small, and remember the phrase, ‘every journey starts with a single step’. The moment you make a commitment to getting started is when things start to happen.
  2. Be mindful. In the run up to Wimbledon 2013, it was widely reported how tennis player Novak Djokovic practised both mindfulness and meditation, paying regular visits to a Buddhist temple in London. Mindfulness is a method of focusing on the current moment through activities such as meditation, yoga and breathing.A 10-year study of mindfulness in sport suggested that mindfulness is effective because it helps athletes focus without distraction. “I have to really focus on the job in hand,” Jessica Ennis told Women’s Fitness. “If your mind wanders, you don’t get the most out of the session,” she added.
  3. Endure the pain. “That’s the closest I will come to knowing what it’s like to have a baby,” said Sir Bradley Wiggins when he broke the world record for distance cycled in an hour in the summer of 2015.Don’t get comfortable! Athletes are happy to put up with pain and a review from 2012 revealed that they have a higher pain threshold than the average. Push out of your comfort zone and keep in mind the phrase made famous by Susan Jeffers’ book: Feel The Fear and Do It Anyway.
  4. Have a vision. Visualise and rehearse in your mind your best performance. In the film Rush, there’s a scene when world champion racing driver, James Hunt, drives the entire course in his mind, holding his steering wheel and talking through each and every twist and turn. Visualising your success, your race, a slimmer healthier you in action gets results.
  5. Believe in yourself. A study in the Journal of Applied Sport Psychology aimed to examine what mental toughness was all about. They found of the 12 attributes that define mental toughness an “unshakable self-belief in your ability to achieve your competition goals” emerged as the most important.
  6. Repeat a mantra. Positive self-talk works. Researchers have shown that using simple positive phrases, such as “I can” or “ball-target” help with both power-based and more precision-based skills according to the British Psychological Society.
  7. Celebrate success. Mo has the ‘Mobot’ and Usain Bolt has the ‘lightening’. It’s vital to celebrate your success as it confirms that all the work and commitment was worth it – so bask in your glory.

 

Vitamin C

Vitamin C has a number of functions that help to keep us healthy, strong and illness free.

 

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What is Vitamin C?

Vitamin C is also known as ascorbic acid. It is essential for the growth and repair of all tissues, and helps to produce the protein collagen. Collagen is used to make skin, cartilage, tendons and ligaments, and therefore vital in maintaining healthy joints and connective tissue. Vitamin C is also essential to bone health, for a healthy thyroid gland, and to help the body cope with stress. Vitamin C aids iron absorption and is a potent water-soluble antioxidant.


Food Sources

  • Beansprouts
  • Berries
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Potatoes
  • Cauliflower
  • Kale
  • Peppers
  • Kiwi fruit
  • Parsley
  • Oranges
  • Spinach
  • Sprouts
  • Turnips
  • Melon
  • Grapefruit
  • Lemons
  • Watercress
  • Tomatoes


The Benefits of Vitamin C

  • Protects cells and assists in wound healing.
  • Maintains healthy joints and connective tissue.
  • Supports the immune system.
  • Important for optimal post-exercise recovery.
  • Supports the body during times of stress and illness.


When to supplement

Vitamin C is perhaps best known for its role in helping to prevent and cure colds, and as an all-round immunity booster. However, when it comes to the general population its status as a cure for the common cold has been put under scrutiny. The Cochrane Review in 2004 looked at 29 studies (with 11,000+ participants) and concluded that regular use of vitamin C had no effect on common cold incidence in the general population. However, when the body is put under significant stress, for example when we exercise, research has found that it can help alleviate the symptoms of a cold. Trials looking at the effects of vitamin C have shown that it can halve the incidence and duration of the common cold amongst sporty individuals. Other research has shown that vitamin C plays a role in conditions such as exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (also known as exercise induced asthma). A 2014 round up of research from the University of Helsinki cited in Science Daily found that Vitamin C halved post-exercise FEV1 decline (i.e. the amount of air you can blow out within one second) in participants who suffered from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

Vitamin C also has a role to play in the helping the body absorb iron, particularly non-haem (vegetarian sources) of iron. Sports people (especially women) often need significantly more iron compared to the general population, and may therefore need more vitamin C, too. “For one part of iron to be properly absorbed five parts of vitamin C are required. That puts the vitamin C requirement for a sportswoman at 205mg daily, and for the sportsman at 180mg”, suggested running coach Frank Horwill in an article for the Serpentine Running Club in London.