Introducing our Shop

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We’ve embarked on a journey of building a health service that can help you achieve your health goals, whether you simply want to become more active and eat well, or your managing an active athletic lifestyle

Amplify’s small and passionate team have been working tirelessly on a revolutionary set of services, that will help to transform your health and life. And we are proud to launch a vitamins and supplements store with a wide range of health and fitness products, as our first milestone.

We are dedicated to providing a wide range of products and brands, that we know most of you are taking today, to maintain your health and to supplement your active lifestyle. And we promise what we are building in this store keeps very much in line with our broader health service offering and will always add value to your life.

If you want to continue to hear about our developments, you can drop us your email address here.

We’ll send on more updates as we go along!

 

 

7 Nutrition Tweaks for Active People

If you exercise and maintain a healthy and active life, it makes sense to ensure you are in the driving seat when it comes to nutrition, too. Here are some easy tips to help you make changes for the better NOW!

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  1. Choose ‘active-friendly’ nutrients

One in five adults and one in six children may have low vitamin levels of the ‘sunshine’ vitamin – an estimated 10 million people across England alone, according to NICE recommendations from 2014. Vitamin D is essential for active people as it’s been shown to help build strong bones and boost muscle health. Other essentials for anyone keeping active include magnesium, which is lost when we sweat, and essential fatty acids for a healthy heart. And take antioxidants to protect against damaging free radicals, which according to studies are produced when we train, particularly if it’s hard enough to feel exhausted. Try sports antioxidants from Reflex to beat oxidative stress.

  1. Eat before exercise

Before a run, cycle or cardio event, endurance athletes should focus on consuming slow release carbs and allow time to digest the fuel (this will vary from person to person, but for most it’s around two hours). If you’re in a hurry grab a carb bar, such as SIS’s Go Energy Bar. If you’re lifting weights opt for lean protein and carbs, for example lean chicken and noodles or for time-pressed gym bunnies try a Promax Bar from Maxi Nutrition.

  1. Fuel up on the move

If you’re working out aerobically for 90 minutes or more you’ll need to top up your glycogen stores and keep on top of electrolytes. The American College of Sports Medicine recommend we fuel every 45-60 minutes during a long workout, taking on board 30-60 grams of carbohydrate (120-240 calories) per hour. For ideas on what to eat during your workout visit the Amplify Shop.

  1. Get Carbs on board after your workout

After a long run or bike ride, or hard session at the gym, you’ll need to boost your carb and protein levels for energy and repair. “Choose a three-to-one ratio, carb:protein if you’ve trained hard and re-fuel within the first hour – the acute phase of recovery,” suggests Dr Justin Roberts from Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge. Unrefined, or liquid sources of carbs are a good choice as they will digest quicker, try SIS Rapid Rego Recovery and for more ideas, check out all our post workout nutrition products.

  1. Stay Hydrated

Staying hydrated is vital for total health as well as maintaining good performance in sport and it’s why we’ve included a hydration measure on our dashboard (coming soon!). When you are exercising and active it’s essential to stay on top of hydration levels, particularly as the weather heats up in the summer months. Try Zero Extreme tablets, which have the added benefits of extra vitamins, or Higher Nature’s Performax sachets with added electrolytes, great for post workout rehydration.

  1. Eat for your body type

Precision Nutrition, the world’s largest online nutrition coaching company make the recommendations based on body type. Ectomorphs (longer limbs and skinnier bodies – a typical runner) metabolise carbohydrates better than other body types. The recommendation is for a 55:25:20 diet (carbs: protein: fats). Mesomorphs (stockier, muscular athletic types) need a 40:30:30 diet. And endomorphs (rounder and heavier) are recommended a 25:35:40 combination.

  1. Get rid of refined sugar

Eddie Izzard, the 54 year old comedian who recently ran 27 marathons in 27 days, gave up ‘refined sugar’ three years ago, ‘Once you get yourself off refined sugar, you do get to a much better place,’ he told the BBC. The simplest way to kick-start going sugar-free is to get label savvy. If sugar is in the Red, don’t buy it! Hidden sugar is in most foods, even those we perceive to be healthy. For example, a 100g portion of granola can have around 13g of sugar. Swap sugar-laden cereal for protein, for example, boiled eggs, which will fill you up, and give you energy.

Looking for sugar free fuel for your training – check out the range at the Amplify Shop.

 

 

Vitamin C

Vitamin C has a number of functions that help to keep us healthy, strong and illness free.

 

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What is Vitamin C?

Vitamin C is also known as ascorbic acid. It is essential for the growth and repair of all tissues, and helps to produce the protein collagen. Collagen is used to make skin, cartilage, tendons and ligaments, and therefore vital in maintaining healthy joints and connective tissue. Vitamin C is also essential to bone health, for a healthy thyroid gland, and to help the body cope with stress. Vitamin C aids iron absorption and is a potent water-soluble antioxidant.


Food Sources

  • Beansprouts
  • Berries
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Potatoes
  • Cauliflower
  • Kale
  • Peppers
  • Kiwi fruit
  • Parsley
  • Oranges
  • Spinach
  • Sprouts
  • Turnips
  • Melon
  • Grapefruit
  • Lemons
  • Watercress
  • Tomatoes


The Benefits of Vitamin C

  • Protects cells and assists in wound healing.
  • Maintains healthy joints and connective tissue.
  • Supports the immune system.
  • Important for optimal post-exercise recovery.
  • Supports the body during times of stress and illness.


When to supplement

Vitamin C is perhaps best known for its role in helping to prevent and cure colds, and as an all-round immunity booster. However, when it comes to the general population its status as a cure for the common cold has been put under scrutiny. The Cochrane Review in 2004 looked at 29 studies (with 11,000+ participants) and concluded that regular use of vitamin C had no effect on common cold incidence in the general population. However, when the body is put under significant stress, for example when we exercise, research has found that it can help alleviate the symptoms of a cold. Trials looking at the effects of vitamin C have shown that it can halve the incidence and duration of the common cold amongst sporty individuals. Other research has shown that vitamin C plays a role in conditions such as exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (also known as exercise induced asthma). A 2014 round up of research from the University of Helsinki cited in Science Daily found that Vitamin C halved post-exercise FEV1 decline (i.e. the amount of air you can blow out within one second) in participants who suffered from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

Vitamin C also has a role to play in the helping the body absorb iron, particularly non-haem (vegetarian sources) of iron. Sports people (especially women) often need significantly more iron compared to the general population, and may therefore need more vitamin C, too. “For one part of iron to be properly absorbed five parts of vitamin C are required. That puts the vitamin C requirement for a sportswoman at 205mg daily, and for the sportsman at 180mg”, suggested running coach Frank Horwill in an article for the Serpentine Running Club in London.

Vitamin D

It’s estimated that around one in 5 adults, and around one in 6 children, may have low vitamin D status – an estimated 10 million people across England. We explore the benefits of this vital nutrient and explain why you may need to supplement

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What is vitamin D?

Vitamin D isn’t like other vitamins, which are chemicals we need for good health. Often referred to as the sunshine vitamin it’s the only vitamin that can be generated by our own bodies. In fact, it is probably more appropriately described as a ‘pro-hormone’. The energy provided through the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) light leads to natural cholesterol stored in our skin being able to change in form twice, leading to production of vitamin D3, the most beneficial, and biologically active form for humans – also known as cholecalciferol. From here, vitamin D is transported to the liver, then kidneys, where some more chemical changes take place. This allows the vitamin to become activated and take part in its many useful processes.


The Benefits of vitamin D

Vitamin D and your health

In the 1900s vitamin D was linked to preventing rickets. Recent research has shown that it has a role to play in all aspects of health. Vitamin D deficiencies have been linked with high blood pressure1, obesity2, poor lung function3, multiple sclerosis4, and even schizophrenia5. Taking Vitamin D is also important for pregnant mothers, protecting the unborn baby, and helping deliver babies with a healthier heart.

Bone health

Vitamin D is needed for the incorporation of calcium into the bones, helping bones grow and strengthen. In an article published in the Current Sports Medicine Report in 2010, two scientists Larson-Meyer and Willis discussed emerging evidence that adequate vitamin D intake reduces risk of stress fracture (as well as total body inflammation, infectious illness, and impaired muscle function).

Muscle function: power and strength

A study of ballet dancers found that supplementation with vitamin D helped to improve muscular strength in vitamin D deficient dancers: they were able to jump higher and had fewer injuries. Other research found vitamin D was positively related to muscle power, force and velocity.

Vitamin D deficiency lowers immunity

Many studies (including one of 19,000 people over a six-year period6) have found that low levels of vitamin D result in a higher reported incidence of upper respiratory infections. This has negative consequences for those under physical stress and with often stressed immune systems, such as endurance athletes, and even those who share locker facilities at the gym!


When to take a supplement

Unlike other important vitamins, like vitamin C, dietary sources of vitamin D, usually found in eggs and oily fish, are simply not widely available in sufficient quantities for our needs. In addition, the sun, in northern latitudes, is only strong enough to stimulate vitamin D production in your skin from May to August. To benefit adequately from the sun’s rays, we ideally need 20 minutes skin exposure daily, without sunscreen, between the hours of 10am and 2pm. Even if a person is regularly outdoors (e.g. runners, walkers) the sun exposure they do get is compromised by the use of SPF creams and pollutants. Researchers have found that even distance runners are often not exposed to enough sunshine as they choose to run early morning or evening. A recent US study found that one third of a large cohort of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college athletes at a single institution had abnormally low vitamin D levels.

References:

Blood pressure and vitamin D

Low vitamin D status is associated with greater bone turnover, bone loss and obesity

Poor lung function and vitamin D deficiency

MS and vitamin D

Schizophrenia and vitamin D

Immunity and vitamin D

 

Vitamin B

Energising B Vitamins are found in lots of different foods and help to lift our mood, and energy levels, as well as performing vital functions at key life stages.

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What are B Vitamins?

B vitamins were first grouped together because they were found together in many of the same foods. Whilst they have many similar functions as energy vitamins – i.e. the conversion of food into energy or ATP – scientists soon discovered that these water soluble vitamins are in fact quite different, and have their own unique roles in the body. Some are more crucial to red blood cell production, others in nerve system functioning. All, however are essential to the normal healthy functioning of the body and metabolism. 

Food Sources

All the B vitamins are present in a wide variety of other foods – both from animal and plant sources. Because the B vitamins play such an essential role in our health, many foods are now fortified with several of the B vitamins. However, those that are naturally present in foods are the best source.

  • B1 (thiamine): whole grains, asparagus, kale, cauliflower, potatoes and oranges.
  • B2 (riboflavin): milk, cheese, leafy vegetables, beans, mushrooms and almonds.
  • B3 (niacin):  chicken, fish, tomatoes, leafy vegetables, broccoli, carrots, nuts, beans, mushrooms, tofu and peanut butter.
  • B5 (pantothenic acid): meats, whole grains, avocados, broccoli and mushrooms.
  • B6 (pyridoxine): meats, whole grains, vegetables and nuts.
  • B7 (biotin):  peanuts, leafy green vegetables and corn.
  • B9 (folic acid):  vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans, peas, dairy products, whole grains and meats.
  • B12 (cobalamine): mostly in animal products.

 

The Benefits of B vitamins

The B vitamins (often referred to as the B Complex) are known by several different names and each plays a unique role in the body:

  • B1 (thiamine): Thiamine is important for brain and nerve function as well as energy use throughout the body.
  • B2 (riboflavin): Riboflavin is used to help make and transport energy in the body. It also helps with brain function and helps make chemicals that protect the body from free radical damage.
  • B3 (niacin): Niacin is an essential part of both using energy and storing energy in the body.
  • B5 (pantothenic acid): B5 is often used by the body to break down and build proteins, carbohydrates and fats.
  • B6 (pyridoxine): Vitamin B6 is used to make some of the building blocks of proteins and also helps to break down carbohydrates and fats.
  • B7 (biotin): Biotin is important in making the building blocks of proteins and also helps the body store energy.
  • B9 (folic acid): Folic acid plays a key role in copying and repairing DNA, which makes it especially important in growth.
  • B12 (cobalamine): B12 is important in copying DNA, but also plays a role in breaking down fats and proteins. It’s heavily used in the brain and nervous system.

 

When to take a supplement?

Folic acid is an essential vitamin for pregnant women, as large amounts are needed for the foetus to develop their brain and nervous system. Folic acid is recommended for anyone planning to get pregnant or already pregnant. For the most part, deficiency in any of the B vitamins is uncommon because they are present in many of the foods we eat, or added (i.e. fortification) to several processed foods such as breakfast cereals, that might otherwise be low in B vitamins. Those who are deficient tend to have an illness, follow a strict vegan or vegetarian diet (putting them at risk of B12 deficiency), have malabsorption problems (e.g. the elderly), or have a genetic enzyme dysfunction that puts them more at risk for deficiency. Coeliac disease, or Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) for example, can inhibit absorption of some B vitamins, so often supplementation is necessary. And heavy drinkers are also at risk of B12 deficiency. Older adults tend to be at higher risk for B12 deficiency because their body is less able to absorb it than the body of a younger person. A lack of both B12 and folic acid in adults can cause fatigue and some neurologic problems. Finally, those who eat a diet that is low in fruits, vegetables and whole grains are at risk for deficiency in B vitamins. And according to research published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism athletes with low levels of B vitamins will notice a dip in performance during high-intensity exercise, so if it’s worth checking your levels if you want to perform at your best.

When supplementing, B vitamins are best taken in a “B Complex” form, to ensure a balanced intake.