Martin Yelling’s Long Run Home

Martin Yelling’s Long Run Home

We’re proud to be backing today’s stage of the Long Run Home and donating money to Martin Yelling’s chosen charities (see below).

So far Martin has run 133 miles in four days and today he’ll cover a total of 32 miles between Crackington Haven and Padstow. Martin’s goal for the long run home goal is to run the entire South West Coast path, a total of 630 miles in  21 days.

Check out where Martin’s running, by clicking on the image below.

Martin Yelling's Long Run Home
Martin Yelling’s Long Run Home

We’re supporting Martin who is running the south west coast path for three charities he cares about: The Southmead Hospital Charity, Julia’s House and MacMillan Cancer Support. You can too sponsor Martin at: http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/MartinYelling128.

Martin sets off Martin and runner

For more action today:

* Stage discussion: https://www.facebook.com/events/1048183521933746/
* Live tracking of Martin for every stage: http://live.opentracking.co.uk/longrunhome/

 

Getting Carbs Right for Sport

Getting Carbs Right for Sport

Runners love pasta parties, and endurance athletes are fuelled by gels and sweets, but do we need to rethink our relationship with carbs for the best performance? Runner and coach, Fiona Bugler and sports nutritionist Lucy Ann Prideaux report.

The movement to ‘train low carb and race high carb’ has gathered momentum in recent years amongst triathletes, cyclists – and even runners! And former carb fans, such as world renowned running expert, Tim Noakes, author of the The Lore of Running have had a complete change of view, saying excess amounts of carbs (especially high GI, sugary and refined carbs), are not good for runners and that sugar and processed food is responsible for the obesity epidemic and shocking rises in diseases such as diabetes (A Diabetes UK report in August 2015 found that there has been a 60 per cent increase in the disease in a decade).

Carb diet options for athletes

So how does the ‘traditional’ endurance athlete’s high-carb diet work? The body will easily adapt to a high-carb diet, becoming highly efficient at metabolizing carbohydrates for energy. In a long run or race for example, a runner may top up with energy-boosting carb gels. If they don’t have gels, they may under perform not because carbs are the only answer, but because their body has adapted to carbohydrate metabolism, burns carbs quickly, and needs regular top-ups. It expects to receive regular amounts of glucose to continue making energy.

The theory goes on that if you train the body to use fat when you run you do not need to be loading up with extra carbs. However, some athletes find that during this transition period, when relying too much on burning fat as fuel it’s harder to move faster or step up a gear, as the body can’t make energy quickly enough, and they run out of juice during training – and catastrophically, on race day. Many opt to ‘train low’ on carbs (50 per cent fats, 25 per cent carbs, and 25 per cent protein) for five to 10 days. Then, one to three days before a race, they opt for carb-loading with 80 per cent of their food coming from carbohydrates, 10 per cent from fat, and 10 per cent from protein, and take carbs on board during the race, i.e. ‘race high’.

We still need carbs – but watch your GI score

Carbs do supply readily available energy for performance but it’s important that the carbs we eat are healthy and we understand that not all carbs are equal. Carbohydrates are ranked using a scoring system called the glycemic index (GI). The GI score of a food is based on the rate at which it breaks down into sugar (glucose), how fast it is absorbed, and consequently how quickly is raises levels of blood glucose.

High GI Carbohydrates breakdown quickly during digestion, and release glucose into the blood very quickly.

Examples: processed ‘white’ foods, pure sugar, and energy gels.

✗Eating too many high GI foods can block the ability to burn fat.

✗High GI foods don’t fill you up and you’ll get hungry again quickly.

✓High GI food can provide fast-energy replenishment or be used during exercise – e.g. energy gels.

Low GI Carbohydrates breakdown slowly, releasing their glucose gradually into the blood stream.

Examples: Apples, pears, plums, oranges, grapefruits, raspberries, blueberries, kiwis, fresh figs; brown rice, wild rice, quinoa, barley, a few wholegrain breads such as dark whole rye bread, soy/linseed bread, and vegetables.

✓Provide longer-lasting energy, and a more sustained feeling of fullness, therefore aid in fat loss.

✓Generally, these foods are higher in fibre and nutrients, too.

 

The ultimate solution and best diet for athletes, is one that is flexible and includes moderate amounts of healthy carbohydrates balanced with quality proteins and essential fats. During periods of intense training, and leading up to long endurance events, the athlete should increase the amount of carbs, based on their particular energy expenditure, and their response to carbohydrates. Trial and error is necessary to a degree, and eventually the individual finds the perfect amount for them to train, recover, and race successfully.

 

#MyMarathonMeal by Martin Yelling

#MyMarathonMeal by Martin Yelling

Top endurance sports coach and former international runner, Martin Yelling shares his choice of pre marathon meal:

“Rice (white or brown), a light sauce, stir fried green beans, broccoli and chicken. A little vanilla ice cream (simple!) and perhaps half glass of red wine.

“Relaxing, easy no fuss food that I’m used to. Carbohydrates, proteins and a waft of something sweet.”

You can meet Martin at the Virgin London Marathon Expo: https://www.virginmoneylondonmarathon.com/en-gb/training/training-seminars/

7 Ways to Think Like An Athlete


We admire athletes for their focused approach to performance. They tap into discipline, strength and positive thinking and get results. Think like an athlete and perform better at sport – and in life!

 

Sprinter leaving starting blocks on the running track. Explosive

 

  1. Think big. Be limitless in your thought process. In a special article for the New England Journal of Medicine, the authors reveal that the more ambitious the weight loss goal, the bigger the success!
    However, it also makes sense to start small, and remember the phrase, ‘every journey starts with a single step’. The moment you make a commitment to getting started is when things start to happen.
  2. Be mindful. In the run up to Wimbledon 2013, it was widely reported how tennis player Novak Djokovic practised both mindfulness and meditation, paying regular visits to a Buddhist temple in London. Mindfulness is a method of focusing on the current moment through activities such as meditation, yoga and breathing.A 10-year study of mindfulness in sport suggested that mindfulness is effective because it helps athletes focus without distraction. “I have to really focus on the job in hand,” Jessica Ennis told Women’s Fitness. “If your mind wanders, you don’t get the most out of the session,” she added.
  3. Endure the pain. “That’s the closest I will come to knowing what it’s like to have a baby,” said Sir Bradley Wiggins when he broke the world record for distance cycled in an hour in the summer of 2015.Don’t get comfortable! Athletes are happy to put up with pain and a review from 2012 revealed that they have a higher pain threshold than the average. Push out of your comfort zone and keep in mind the phrase made famous by Susan Jeffers’ book: Feel The Fear and Do It Anyway.
  4. Have a vision. Visualise and rehearse in your mind your best performance. In the film Rush, there’s a scene when world champion racing driver, James Hunt, drives the entire course in his mind, holding his steering wheel and talking through each and every twist and turn. Visualising your success, your race, a slimmer healthier you in action gets results.
  5. Believe in yourself. A study in the Journal of Applied Sport Psychology aimed to examine what mental toughness was all about. They found of the 12 attributes that define mental toughness an “unshakable self-belief in your ability to achieve your competition goals” emerged as the most important.
  6. Repeat a mantra. Positive self-talk works. Researchers have shown that using simple positive phrases, such as “I can” or “ball-target” help with both power-based and more precision-based skills according to the British Psychological Society.
  7. Celebrate success. Mo has the ‘Mobot’ and Usain Bolt has the ‘lightening’. It’s vital to celebrate your success as it confirms that all the work and commitment was worth it – so bask in your glory.

 

Marathon – Tapering & Race Fuel

Marathon – Tapering & Race Fuel

As we approach the tail end of your preparation for the marathon, and are gearing up for the big day, here are a few nutritional tips that will give you the confidence to complete the race with a smile on your face.


Eat more carbs – but not more calories

The goal for carbohydrates should be to maintain a daily intake of 3-5 grams per pound of body weight (6-10 g/kg).

So if you weigh 9 stone, that’s up to 630g, which is up to 2500 calories.

You’ll also need protein and fresh/fruit and veg, and you’ll be doing less miles, so don’t be surprised if you put on a few pounds over the next few weeks. Don’t worry – you will burn it off!


Snack well

Fill your fridge with healthy snacks, so when you do get a pang of hunger you can fill up guilt-free and get the reward of taking in your five to 10 a day. Try carrots, celery and humus or tomato salsa dip, fresh fruit slices and cubes of feta cheese (eaten with oat cakes or rice cakes).

GROUPSHOT-CliffBar_12X68g-400

For on the go nutrition keep topped up with tasty Clif Bars, made with wholesome ingredients that deliver on energy – and taste.


Stay hydrated

As well as drinking lots of water, throughout the day, an antioxidant-rich smoothie or juice (made with dark berries and vitamin rich fruit) is the multi-tasker’s way to fill up.

Coconut water is a great alternative fruit blast, and Chi 100% Pure Coconut Water is packed with electrolytes, is fat free and has the lowest natural sugar and calories of all brands. (It does help that a portion of all proceeds go to the One Seed One Life Charity, supplying orphanages across Thailand with basic supplies.)


Beetroot for endurance

Add beetroot to salad, smoothies, or check out a pre-made beetroot juice. If you cannot stomach the taste, a supplement can be a replacement, such as BioCare’s Beetroot Extract.

Beetroot has been extensively shown to help boost endurance because it boosts nitrate levels in the blood, which can lower blood pressure and reduce oxygen consumption during moderate running.


Race day nutrition 

You need to try anything you take during the race  before you race!

Before you get to the start line, consume a 500ml carb drink with electrolytes, and on the run, you’ll need gels/blocks and drinks.  You’ll need between 100 and 150 calories of carbs every hour of the marathon (but check the pack as it will vary according to your weight and the conditions).

Clif Bar Block Shots are easy to digest, but you will need to consume quite a number to keep topped up (around three and hour). Gels, such as High 5 Energy Gel can be thick and gooey, or a lighter consistency. If you opt for a thicker, gooey gel, take it near an aid station so you can wash down with water.

GROUPSHOT-High5_BoxedGelsAndPowder-400

After the race you might feel a little sick from all those gels, but do try to get a protein: carb mix on board, for example, a 50g sachet of SIS Rego Rapid Recovery or opt for a tasty carbohydrate bar, such as Reload Flapjack Fused Fruit from Grenade.


For more information about eating on race day, check out our piece, 7 Nutrition tweaks for active people.